Encouraging Elderly Exercise

Nearly nine in 10 people think feeling weaker is one of the worst parts of aging, but few Americans over the age of 45 are taking steps to prevent muscle loss, a new study finds.

The survey, commissioned by Abbott and developed in conjunction with the AGS Foundation for Health in Aging, found that nearly 90 percent of Americans older than 45 are not making daily exercise and proper nutrition part of their daily routines to protect their muscles as they age.

“Muscle loss is a serious issue that can lead to severe health and lifestyle consequences, yet building and maintaining muscle isn’t top of mind for most adults,” said Evelyn Granieri, M.D., M.P.H., MSEd., of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. “Especially with an aging baby boomer population, it’s important that people take charge of their health and take action now so that they can continue doing the things they enjoy in the future.”

According to Medical News Today, clinical research shows that starting at age 40, a person can lose 8 percent of muscle per decade, which can lead to loss of strength, mobility and the freedom to enjoy life.

Granieri said that talking to one’s doctor or dietician is a great way to identify small steps to take to protect muscle health today for a more active future.

CAREGivers also are in a position to help clients protect against muscle loss by encouraging them to exercise and making sure they are eating nutritious meals. If you would like more information about having one of our CAREGivers helping with a loved one’s daily exercise needs, please contact us at Kitsap Peninsula Home Instead Office or try our phone at 360-782-4663.


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